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Northeast Property Group has a proven track record, providing leading commercial brokerage and property management services in Connecticut for over 25 years. Call (860) 437-7005 for a customized real estate solution.

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7 Steps to Finding A Rental in Connecticut

When searching for a house to rent, look for a property that is safe, comfortable and conveniently located. There are several ways to find rental homes, including directly connecting with landlords, working with a rental search service, or contacting a real estate agent or property management firm, like Northeast Property Group. Here are tips for finding a great home with minimum hassle:

1. Identify your needs

Before you go house hunting, identify your needs. Not only will this cut down on time spent searching through rentals, but the information will help property managers or rental search reps find a home that works for you and your family. Things to consider include location; number of rooms; proximity to public transit, schools and shopping; and rent amount.

2. Check your credit report

Many landlords and property management companies run credit checks on potential tenants, so it’s a good idea to check your credit with the three major credit bureaus before you begin your search. If you have bad credit, be prepared to offer an explanation, as well as an additional security deposit, to landlords or property managers.

3. Research landlords, rental agencies and property managers

Research landlords and third-party search and property management companies before signing a lease or handing over any money. Make sure the company you choose to work with is licensed and insured and has a good reputation. At Northeast Property Group, we’ve been providing rental and leasing services for over 20 years and have all the necessary licensing and experience. You’ll want to work with agencies or landlords that respond quickly to problems, refund security deposits promptly and treat tenants well. If you have questions about the integrity of an individual or business, move on.

4. Research state and local laws

State and local landlord and tenant laws usually spell out the rights and duties of both parties. It’s to your advantage to understand these laws. Legal aid societies, city housing departments and attorney general offices may provide landlord-tenant handbooks for free via their websites. If you know your rights and responsibilities, you’ll be better able to identify scams and illegal lease provisions. A leasing agent at Northeast Property group will have a thorough understanding of the laws and will be able answer your questions.

5. Inspect properties

Don’t sign a lease or rental agreement without personally inspecting the property. When you visit, make note of any problems and ask the property manager or landlord to fix them before you sign a lease. If you sign before the issues are corrected, you’ve lost a lot of leverage.

6. Carefully review the lease

Don’t sign a lease until you’ve read it over. Ideally, you should have a lawyer look it over and explain anything you don’t understand. Pay attention to information about fees and expenses, such as security deposits, lock change fees and utility payments.

7. Special consideration for a house

If you rent a house, make sure the lease makes clear who is responsible for exterior maintenance, including landscaping duties. If you don’t like a section of the lease, bring it up to the landlord or property manager. You might be able to get it removed or changed.

Contact Northeast Property Group Today To Find An Apartment for Rent (860) 437-7005

Read more about Northeast Property Group’s rental information here: http://www.neproperty.com/brokerage-home/residential-real-estate/residential-rentals/

About the Author

Chris Myers2001 Graduate of UConn with a Bachelor of Science in Management Information Systems. Chris is a licensed Realtor and a property manager since 2002, specializing in condominium association and commercial management. Chris is also a member of CAI and a certified manager of community association's.View all posts by Chris Myers →